Premier Audiologist & Hearing Aids Arizona

How Do I Get Medicare to Pay for a Hearing Aid in Arizona?

Under current Medicare regulations, hearing loss evaluations and hearing aids are not covered in Arizona. This means that you will have to pay all costs for testing and hearing aid equipment and supplies out-of-pocket. If you’ve suffered hearing loss because of an accident or workplace neglect, Medicare may pay for most or all costs for a hearing aid. You will have to prove, however, that the hearing loss was the direct cause of an injury or accident.

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Review your current Medicare policy to see if hearing evaluation testing and hearing aids are covered or partially covered. Most Medicare policies will not cover hearing tests or hearing aids. There are some HMO Medicare policies that may cover some of the these costs, however.

Visit your physician to discuss your hearing loss. Ask your physician to document the severity of your hearing loss. Present this information to your Medicare provider. Some of the costs associated with the purchase of a hearing aid may be covered under Part B of your Medicare plan.

Determine if your hearing loss was the result of aging or due to an accident or incident that permanently damaged your hearing. Many Medicare policies will cover the costs of hearing tests and hearing aids in Arizona if you were involved in a car accident, industrial accident or if you can prove your hearing loss is the direct result of an unsafe work environment.

Maintain all records, evaluations, documents, and correspondence pertaining to your case. Even if your Medicare plan won’t cover the costs associated with hearing aids, this may change in the future.

Review your Medicare policy each year to determine coverage changes. Research other Medicare providers and compare insurance plans. Some policies may cover more of the costs and offer lower co-payments than others.

What Is the Role of an Audiologist?

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Understanding what an audiologist in Arizona is before heading into your first appointment helps make the process a lot simpler. Audiologists are professionals whose specialties lie within diagnosing, researching and treating any problems correlated with the individual’s ears, especially those pertaining to the auditory system and problems within the vestibular system. This system within the ear is responsible for your balance, while the auditory system holds the responsibility of determining how well you are able to hear.

Education Required for an Audiologist

Within the United States, an audiologist will need a doctoral degree in audiology. They will also have to undergo extensive testing before they are granted the necessary licensing to practice in their field. On average, they will have to serve up to a year as an intern before completing the proper education that they receive within the classroom setting.

These professionals are trained to do many forms of testing to help determine just how severe one’s degree of loss is, as well as any potential problems relating to the ear canal. Most of the time, the audiologist will be a member of the American Board of Audiology.

Even though an audiologist is unable to perform surgery or prescribe various medications, they are able to run a battery of tests on children, adults, infants and the elderly. Based upon the findings in the test results, they will determine whether you are suffering with a loss of hearing, the degree of loss and whether your problem can be treated through a hearing aid or some other type of means.

In most cases, the audiologist will often recommend what type of hearing aid you need based upon your level of loss. They can also offer other types of devices for your specific case that will help to make your life that much simpler. If there is some type of medical condition that needs to be addressed, which occurs within roughly 10 percent of those with loss of hearing, the audiologist will then send you over to an otolaryngologist.

As soon as your hearing aid arrives, the audiologist will go through and carefully perform the necessary adjustments to help give you the proper fit. They also work to give you the absolute best in clarity and amplification of sound. The audiologist will help walk you through how to care for your device properly and how to use the device for the greatest benefits. If you have any questions after returning home with your devices, you can always ask the Arizona audiologist.

Numerous people are upset when they first discover they are dealing with profound loss of hearing. The good thing is numerous audiologists are trained for counseling the patient and family members. They can help them come to grips with their limitations and help support them throughout the period of adjustment for their new device. An audiologist will also work to help explain the different situations to a family member and provide them with the tools they need in helping their loved ones learn how to adjust to the hearing issues they are facing.

How to Price Hearing Aids

Hearing Test Online If you suffer from mild to severe hearing loss, your doctor may have ordered that you use a hearing aid. Although you will immediately notice the extent to which it improves your hearing, you may eventually reach a point where you become accustomed to this accentuated hearing and you are unable to do without it. In this situation, if you happen to lose your hearing aid, you'll want to find it as quickly as possible.

Things You'll Need

  • Flashlight (optional)  Retrace your steps going back in time, starting at the moment you realized your hearing aid was lost. Think back to what you were doing, how long you'd been doing it and what you were doing before. If necessary, write out a list of all the places you went and things you did so you can be meticulous in your search efforts.
  Rule out scenarios that might mean the hearing aid is permanently gone and must be replaced, such as if you were working over the sink recently or you were taking out the trash and your hearing aid might have fallen in. If you know for a fact that you last had it inside your home and you weren't doing anything that would have rendered it irretrievable, then you know that continuing to search inside your home will lead to its recovery sooner or later.   Inspect floors, counters, drawers and pieces of furniture you might have used to make sure your hearing aid didn't drop at one of those locations. If it's dark in your house or you need to inspect an area with low lighting, use a flashlight to aid you. Take a short break in your search if you come up with nothing or if you stress yourself out. Sometimes, getting your mind off your fixation can offer you the moment of clarity you need to solve the problem. A bit of extra energy might also help you in your efforts.   Call or email your doctor if you've searched thoroughly and repeatedly but are unable to find your misplaced hearing aid. Depending on the extent of your hearing loss, you may need a replacement immediately. If you received your hearing aid with the help of your medical insurance plan, check your plan documents to see if your insurer covers to cost of hearing aid replacement.